Health & Fitness

Get Serious About Your Health

Tips for Getting Seriously Healthy from One of the ‘Best Doctors in America’

Salt is Good for You
Calcium Supplements are Bad
& the Lab Test Everyone Should Get 
 
 
There’s a reason – well, several – why so many diseases are increasing in frequency in the United States, making some that were almost unheard of 100 years ago commonplace today, says Robert Thompson, M.D., a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, and integrative medicine specialist deemed by his peers to be in the top 5 percent of US physicians. Thompson was added to the peer-reviewed directory, “Best Doctors in America,” in 1996.
 
“The United States is now 46th in men’s mortality and the absolute worst country in the industrialized world for first-day infant mortality,” says Thompson, author of “The Calcium Lie II: What Your Doctor Still Doesn’t Know,” a new book that details the roles minerals play in overall health and how to identify and correct deficiencies and imbalances.
 
“Based on the current rate of autism diagnoses, there will be no ‘normal’ male babies born in the U.S. by 2030,” he says. “The number of children with life-threatening allergies has increased more than 1,000 percent since 1995.”
A perfect storm of corporate power, profits and public misinformation has succeeded in overwhelming the basic biochemical and physiological tenets of good health, says Thompson. “Mineral deficiencies are responsible for a host of health problems, which are incorrectly treated by drugs,” he says. “We’re told by the government and the medical community that we should be ingesting certain amounts of vitamin and mineral supplements to prevent disease, like osteoporosis, when in reality, the recommendations lead to other very serious health problems.”
 
Calcium is just one of 12 substances, as well as traces of 64 other minerals, that make up our bones. Excessive amounts of calcium hurt our bodies in many ways, especially the heart and the brain, he says. We cannot possibly replace minerals with just calcium, which hardens concrete and makes bones more brittle.
One study, published in the British Medical Journal in 2008, was meant to assess the effect of calcium on bone density and fractures in postmenopausal women. Researchers found that participating women were significantly more likely to suffer heart attacks while taking calcium supplements.
“This is far from an isolated study – there are others, including 15 studies combined into a meta-analysis yielding similar heart-health results, which show an increased risk of heart disease by at least 30 percent,” says Thompson, who offers these suggestions for people to take charge of their health:
 
•  Get a hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA) to determine your mineral status. 
This may be the most important health test that exists, Thompson says. Only when you and your doctor know for sure your mineral status and important ratios can you adapt your diet, minerals and supplements to work toward proper balance.
 
•  Do not take calcium supplements unless tests indicate a deficiency. We’ve all been told that we must ingest lots of calcium to ensure strong bones. In fact, calcium is just one of at least 12 minerals in our bones, all of which must be present in the right balance for good bone health. Calcium has been added to so much of our food, it’s unlikely most of us are deficient. And yet, people are told to take calcium supplements. Excess calcium can cause kidney stones, gallstones, arterial plaque, bone spurs, calcium deposits in tissues other than bone, and brain cell dysfunction, brain shrinkage and dementia. Instead of calcium, Thompson instructs his patients and readers to take a minimum of 3 grams of trace minerals derived from ionic sea salt every day.
 
•  Salt (sodium) is necessary for digestion, nutrient absorption, cell function and metabolism. Limiting salt intake is not only the wrong advice for 90 percent of the people at risk for high blood pressure, it also contributes to the lack of minerals in our bodies. Many of us are actually deficient in sodium.
Salt is a mineral, and unrefined sea salt and rock salt is the best source of sodium and ionic minerals. If you are sodium deficient, add harvested pure sea salt to your foods. It is important to use pure sea salt, and not the common table salt, as processing has stripped common table salt of its mineral value.
 
•  Get your fill of essential fatty acids. Raw nuts and/or seeds are a good source. In 2003, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the following health claim for seven kinds of nuts: “Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 oz. per day of most raw nuts as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Omega-3 and Omega-6 are considered essential because humans can’t manufacture them within our bodies. Research has now shown that plant-derived Omega 6, and not fish oil, is the best oil for humans.
 
•  Eat high-quality proteins. Seafood, eggs, beans, chicken, game meat, duck and turkey are excellent sources of essential amino acids that are the building blocks of every protein molecule, hormone, neurotransmitter, and of cell membranes and immune molecules. Proteins can also be obtained from grains, sprouted grains, raw nuts and raw seeds. Vegetarians and vegans need to play close attention to combine protein sources to get the full complement of amino acids.
 
•  Walk at least 30 minutes every day. This activity has a huge effect on relieving the physiologic effects of stress on the human physiology. Exercise is good, but walking is amazing. No other single activity will more significantly or more rapidly affect the adrenal stress response in humans than walking, which probably works so well because it slows us down. And, it is an incredible way to build relationships.
 
•  Use only vitamin supplements made from 100 percent organic whole foods that have been vine-ripened.
Almost all of us need supplements because contemporary food supplies lack adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, thanks to soil depletion. Most store-bought vitamins include just one component of the many complex molecular elements contained in the naturally occurring vitamin source. You need all of the nutrient components to get the full benefits. The best natural sources of readily available vitamins include raw seeds, stabilized rice bran powder, vine-ripened fresh fruits and berries (vitamin C).
 
“Also, I recommend ingesting essential monosaccharides, which is new and unknown territory for most people,” says Thompson. “They are the simplest form of carbohydrate molecules found in the body, are essential for protein molecules and can be found in maple syrup, sweet potatoes, parsnips, beets and onions.”

 

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